Quick Look: March of the Eagles Preview – with Gameplay Video

War-focused strategy recreation of the Napoleonic Wars period

  Strategy future
March of the Eagles is a video game developed and published by Paradox, aiming to recreate one of the most turbulent periods in the history of Europe, that of the Napoleonic Wars that raged at the start of the XIX century.

March of the Eagles is a video game developed and published by Paradox, aiming to recreate one of the most turbulent periods in the history of Europe, that of the Napoleonic Wars that raged at the start of the XIX century.

This is not the same type of grand strategy that Paradox has created with Europa Universalis or Crusader Kings, but a more focused title that asks the player to focus on military force and try to achieve overwhelming superiority over his enemies in order to win.

Economy, diplomacy and research are all highly abstracted in March of the Eagles and the main features of the game are built around military operations, recruitment, leader assignment and peace settlements.

I first played a game as France and, before I managed to familiarize myself with the mechanics, England and her allies managed to defeat me enough times to pretty much force a peace settlement.

I then tried to regroup my forces, create new armies and a new command and control structure and seek vengeance, but I failed to take into account how well England was doing diplomatically, basically surrounding me with her allies.

I ended up fighting her maritime power, Austria and Prussia and I was pretty sure that another defeat was in my future.

March of the Eagles places a lot of importance on army composition, allowing the player to independently set force composition for each flank and then set tactics and commanders based on the available units.

I have managed to create two powerful armies made up of Guards divisions and a lot of artillery, with the Entrenched Defense set of orders, and fought some good defensive battles in order to stop the land advance.

Despite my inferior naval commanders, I have also managed some lucky wins in the Mediterranean and on the coast of France, which create some equilibrium on the seas.

I have then used Napoleon himself, with an infantry and cavalry heavy army, to launch a strike through the north of Germany and drove Prussia out of the war with a white peace settlement before I finally succumbed to an assault from England in Brittany.

I’ve had limited success with March of the Eagles, but the game will probably offer tens of hours of engagement for history and strategy lovers.

Despite the preview stage, the game seems pretty much complete, although I have noticed a few bugs with disappearing siege forces and some weird naval behavior.

Worth a full Softpedia review? Yes.

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